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Oregon’s Claim On Olympic Sports

Every state can boast qualities that transfer to sports, especially with the variety of Olympic sports. But even on that world stage, some states come up short.

For example, no event for breathing pollution? If there was, you’d see gold medals on every neck in LA instead of gold chains.

No event for sauna? That would put gold medals on every summer road crew in Texas.

What about Oregon? What are the characteristics that transfer to sports?

The first thing people ask about Oregon is the rain.

“Does it rain as much as we hear?” they whine.

Yes, it does, it’s wet, which explains our great swimmers. By now you’ve heard of Michael Phelps and his gold medals, Mark Spitz and his gold.

Before them came the great Don Schollander and his haul from the Tokyo Games of 1964. Four golds swam back to Lake Oswego. Not seven or eight, but four was a huge load for the times, the biggest since Jesse Owens’ take from the Nazi Olympics in 1936. Read the rest of this entry

Special Olympics Oregon

by David Gillaspie

originally posted on oregonsportsnews.com

During a recent twenty-four hours, ESPN Sports Radio 1080 The Fan focused on Oregon Special Olympics. The Primetime team of Isaac and Big Suke broadcasted a radiothon of ‘Athletes For Athletes.’ 

How big are the Special Olympics and Special Olympics Oregon?

The first Special Olympics Games were held in Chicago’s Soldier Field in 1968. They drew over a thousand athletes from America and Canada.

Currently, Special Olympics Oregon serves ‘close to 8,000′ athletes, and growing, out of 70,000 people with intellectual disabilities.

Sports have a way of changing numbers. Read the rest of this entry

Green, The New Blue

The State of Oregon, like the other forty-nine states, creates an image reflecting favorably on the region.

Part of the image is the Blue Book.

For some states it begins and ends with symbols and images. That’s their high water mark. 

Not Oregon.

Still a draw as a wonderland of natural beauty, Oregon also means football, big boy football, the sort of football you dream of for all your state colleges but never get.

Oregon gets it. You should too.

Oregon football isn’t a single season flash with junior college transfers making a one year stop before going pro. It’s either guys buying into the program and waiting their turn to contribute, or showing up ready to play on their first day.  

Due to the ever-inspiring feats of the University of  Oregon Duck football program, the word Oregon is on more lips than ever. With that in mind, why not upgrade, or re-imagine, the Oregon state symbols with UO influence. Read the rest of this entry

World Series For Oregonians, Or…

originally posted on http://www.oregonsportsnews.com/

A WORLD SERIES OF MVP OREGONIANS

The World Series once held the title as most important event in sports. Before the Super Bowl, before the NCAA Final Four became a dramatic mini-series, baseball’s finals were all that mattered.

It was a special time before streaming video and pod casts, before smart phones and tablets.

Recreate the magic by inviting your family out for a drive so you can all listen to a game on the radio together. Their response will tell you all you need to know about Major League Baseball’s popularity inOregon.

You’ll need to use all the finesse you can muster; the World Series is a time for bonding.

Pick one game between the St. Louis Cardinals and Texas Rangers and lure your family to the car with the wild exploits of Oregon-born players in the Series. If they don’t get in, promise to share more history with them.

Start withPortland’s Mickey Lolich. Read the rest of this entry

Oregon Football Number Ones, A History

Originally posted on oregonsportsnews.com

The greatest achievement of a professional football player’s career shows him standing on the Super Bowl podium raising the Lombardi Trophy in one hand, the MVP trophy in the other, and shouting “I’m going to Disneyland – World,” into a Mouseketeer microphone.

Anything less is a huge drop-off until you review your own athletic career.

From an astute fan’s perspective, anyone making an NFL roster is a borderline Superman. They are who you call in an emergency if you know one. You don’t get to the league without taking a few hits along the way, NFL sized hits.

If that’s the pro ultimate, what is the college equivalent? Is it standing on the BCS platform raising the crystal football in one hand, the MVP in the other after winning the Heisman, then going #1 overall in the NFL draft? That hasn’t happened in Oregon, yet.

How close to the dream have Beavers or Ducks come? Starting with Oregon, one player in the history of the program has risen to the top of the professional draft. Read the rest of this entry

Museum Collections Or Historical Hoarding

THE THIN ARCHIVAL LINE

A cultivated museum connoisseur sees a roomful of weapons in the Tower of London and marvels at the minor diversity of each piece.

A hoarder sees the same room and thinks of the screw collection in their kitchen drawer.

A philatelist breaks out tweezers and a magnifying glass to plumb the depths of her new stamp collection.

The hoarder hears the word stamps and goes off while they walk the canyons of Sunset Magazines stacked in their living room.

“Stamps are stupid,” they say. “Don’t they know it’s just a stamp, not some cultural insight? Sunset Magazine is about life. So is National Geographic and newspapers. If it’s stamps they want, they can have them.”

The difference between collecting and hoarding is often a question of public and private.

A collector takes pride showing their treasure, unless it’s Nazi loot or pot-hunter grave robbing; a hoarder lives in quiet shame once they reach the point of an intervention.

Unique collections get showcased on the Discovery Channel. Hoarders find themselves on Oprah or A&E. 

Writers gush about museum grade material in Smithsonian Magazine. Hoarders have their obsession pealed away in Psychology TodayRead the rest of this entry

Big Time History

Publsished on oregonsportsnews.com

WHEN IT’S NOT ABOUT SPORTS, IT’S STILL ABOUT SPORTS

A sports fan’s journey to the top of the college football world is the best part of the trip. While a national championship answers all questions with one word, scoreboard, ignoring other teams along the way  leaves out more than you imagine.

When the Beavers checked out at #4 in the nation during the Dennis Erickson era, they raised the bar higher than any point in Oregon State football.

They missed the Big Time where they would have rolled over Oklahoma and one of the Stoops brothers in the Orange Bowl.

A great year? Read the rest of this entry

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