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Category Archives: History

Oregon’s Claim On Olympic Sports

Every state can boast qualities that transfer to sports, especially with the variety of Olympic sports. But even on that world stage, some states come up short.

For example, no event for breathing pollution? If there was, you’d see gold medals on every neck in LA instead of gold chains.

No event for sauna? That would put gold medals on every summer road crew in Texas.

What about Oregon? What are the characteristics that transfer to sports?

The first thing people ask about Oregon is the rain.

“Does it rain as much as we hear?” they whine.

Yes, it does, it’s wet, which explains our great swimmers. By now you’ve heard of Michael Phelps and his gold medals, Mark Spitz and his gold.

Before them came the great Don Schollander and his haul from the Tokyo Games of 1964. Four golds swam back to Lake Oswego. Not seven or eight, but four was a huge load for the times, the biggest since Jesse Owens’ take from the Nazi Olympics in 1936. Read the rest of this entry

Special Olympics Oregon

by David Gillaspie

originally posted on oregonsportsnews.com

During a recent twenty-four hours, ESPN Sports Radio 1080 The Fan focused on Oregon Special Olympics. The Primetime team of Isaac and Big Suke broadcasted a radiothon of ‘Athletes For Athletes.’ 

How big are the Special Olympics and Special Olympics Oregon?

The first Special Olympics Games were held in Chicago’s Soldier Field in 1968. They drew over a thousand athletes from America and Canada.

Currently, Special Olympics Oregon serves ‘close to 8,000’ athletes, and growing, out of 70,000 people with intellectual disabilities.

Sports have a way of changing numbers. Read the rest of this entry

Oregon Football Number Ones, A History

Originally posted on oregonsportsnews.com

The greatest achievement of a professional football player’s career shows him standing on the Super Bowl podium raising the Lombardi Trophy in one hand, the MVP trophy in the other, and shouting “I’m going to Disneyland – World,” into a Mouseketeer microphone.

Anything less is a huge drop-off until you review your own athletic career.

From an astute fan’s perspective, anyone making an NFL roster is a borderline Superman. They are who you call in an emergency if you know one. You don’t get to the league without taking a few hits along the way, NFL sized hits.

If that’s the pro ultimate, what is the college equivalent? Is it standing on the BCS platform raising the crystal football in one hand, the MVP in the other after winning the Heisman, then going #1 overall in the NFL draft? That hasn’t happened in Oregon, yet.

How close to the dream have Beavers or Ducks come? Starting with Oregon, one player in the history of the program has risen to the top of the professional draft. Read the rest of this entry

Making History In Portland

THE LEVERAGE SET WITH TIM HUTTON

Say you’re walking in Portland on a beautiful Sunday afternoon.

Since it’s the golden hour, expect movie production.

But who expects to see stars?

Memo to fans: don’t yell at the talent; they’re actually working, you know, in character.

Apologies to Mr. Hutton.

 

 

 

History For 2.5 Million, Alex

INSPIRED BY THE STATE OF OREGON

Inside the Jeopardy studios, Alex Trebec welcomes one contestant.

Alex: Welcome to Jeopardy. Let’s get started.

Golden Pioneer: Hello Alex. I’ll take Portland for a thousand.

Alex: Easy now, we’re limited at first to $500.

Goldie: Let’s cut to the chase, Alex. Portland for $1000.

Alex: Fine. The answer is, “The Oregon Historical Society.”

Goldie: What is the most important museum in the city?

Alex: Yes. Based on the recent funding, OHS is the leader. Let’s go again.

Goldie: Oregon Social Impact for a thousand, please Alex.

Alex: Going big, eh? And the answer is, “The Oregon Historical Society.” 

Goldie: Which museum has the potential for greatest change in Oregon?

Alex: Yes, OHS. With all the neighborhood problems in Portland, they can all meet at OHS since it is free admission to Multnomah County Residents.

Goldie: I’d like… Read the rest of this entry

OREGON ON D-DAY

Cambridge, England

Some of the most peaceful places on earth are military graveyards.

The Cambridge American Cemetery in England is no exception.

The sense of peace on these grounds feels eerie considering the extremely violent war-time deaths.

Paths on either side of the reflecting pool lead to the memorial.  You don’t expect something unusual in a memorial, especially if you’ve seen a few.

No one expects to see their state symbol in a foreign country.

Finding it means someone from Oregon is buried here?

For Oregonians, as it is for those from other states, the seal has never been more somber.

When you consider those who served and died from your state, it hits home.  You might be memorialized if not for the circumstances of time and birth.

Think of your parents and grandparents, those closer to the fire, when you walk the grounds.  The Greatest Generation got that way by what they did in WWII.

That they left so many of their comrades in so many sites speaks to their drive and fervor. 

WWII did that. Read the rest of this entry

FIND A WALL, TEAR IT DOWN

IT’S AN OREGON TRADITION

The names might be unfamiliar, but you live with their causes every day.

Susan B. Anthony means confusing coinage to some. Her dollar came out the same size as a quarter.

You may get quarter change for her dollar, but you can’t add value to the changes she pushed forward.

Does your Mom vote in elections? 

Does your sister vote, or wife, or any women you know?

Thank Ms Anthony for them.

Women in every state stood up when it was easier to stay down.  None stood taller in Oregon than Abigail Scott Duniway.

When someone achieves important status, they usually do it with help.

You’ve heard of Ida B. Wells-Barnett? Read the rest of this entry