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Category Archives: Oregon History

Making History In Portland

THE LEVERAGE SET WITH TIM HUTTON

Say you’re walking in Portland on a beautiful Sunday afternoon.

Since it’s the golden hour, expect movie production.

But who expects to see stars?

Memo to fans: don’t yell at the talent; they’re actually working, you know, in character.

Apologies to Mr. Hutton.

 

 

 

Shares of Oregon History

Published on oregonlive.com

THEY SPENT THE MONEY, YOU SPEND THE TIME 

If someone invested $2.5 million in what you do, would you take it?

Probably not if it came from a drug cartel or North Korea.

Just to be clear, neither Kim Jong-Il or El Chapo gave the Oregon Historical Society two and a half million; the Oregon state lottery did.

Will the leaders of OHS do something different with $2.5 million than the leaders of the Sinaloa Federation or Pyongyang would do?

Let’s say it together, “Yes, they will.”

Since it is an investment, I have a few ideas, but first let’s clear up a few perceptions about history.

Most of the time, history means reading books with pages so dry they crack and dissolve when you turn them. That’s old history. New history, or slanted history, comes at you from an angle of disbelief and creates more doubt than satisfaction.

Either way, you deal with books, and not everyone wants a history lesson on paper.

OHS is 3D history. You can walk around it, look under it, but you can’t touch it. Is that alone worth $2.5 million? Probably not, since the museum already has exhibits on their floor.

What makes history worth the money, along with the tax levy from Multnomah County? Read the rest of this entry

History For 2.5 Million, Alex

INSPIRED BY THE STATE OF OREGON

Inside the Jeopardy studios, Alex Trebec welcomes one contestant.

Alex: Welcome to Jeopardy. Let’s get started.

Golden Pioneer: Hello Alex. I’ll take Portland for a thousand.

Alex: Easy now, we’re limited at first to $500.

Goldie: Let’s cut to the chase, Alex. Portland for $1000.

Alex: Fine. The answer is, “The Oregon Historical Society.”

Goldie: What is the most important museum in the city?

Alex: Yes. Based on the recent funding, OHS is the leader. Let’s go again.

Goldie: Oregon Social Impact for a thousand, please Alex.

Alex: Going big, eh? And the answer is, “The Oregon Historical Society.” 

Goldie: Which museum has the potential for greatest change in Oregon?

Alex: Yes, OHS. With all the neighborhood problems in Portland, they can all meet at OHS since it is free admission to Multnomah County Residents.

Goldie: I’d like… Read the rest of this entry

The Oregon Bridge

View From The Oregon Bridge (Ross Island)

Portland, like many cities, changes street names to honor the times we live in.

But there’s more to do.

Union Avenue became MLK, and the city celebrated.

SE 39th became Cesar Chavez Blvd., and the city celebrated.

Front Avenue became Naito Parkway, and the city celebrated.

Instead of limiting the celebrations to Portland, why not invite the rest of the state to the party by renaming Ross Island Bridge.

My suggestion: The Oregon Bridge. Read the rest of this entry

OREGON ON D-DAY

Cambridge, England

Some of the most peaceful places on earth are military graveyards.

The Cambridge American Cemetery in England is no exception.

The sense of peace on these grounds feels eerie considering the extremely violent war-time deaths.

Paths on either side of the reflecting pool lead to the memorial.  You don’t expect something unusual in a memorial, especially if you’ve seen a few.

No one expects to see their state symbol in a foreign country.

Finding it means someone from Oregon is buried here?

For Oregonians, as it is for those from other states, the seal has never been more somber.

When you consider those who served and died from your state, it hits home.  You might be memorialized if not for the circumstances of time and birth.

Think of your parents and grandparents, those closer to the fire, when you walk the grounds.  The Greatest Generation got that way by what they did in WWII.

That they left so many of their comrades in so many sites speaks to their drive and fervor. 

WWII did that. Read the rest of this entry

FIND A WALL, TEAR IT DOWN

IT’S AN OREGON TRADITION

The names might be unfamiliar, but you live with their causes every day.

Susan B. Anthony means confusing coinage to some. Her dollar came out the same size as a quarter.

You may get quarter change for her dollar, but you can’t add value to the changes she pushed forward.

Does your Mom vote in elections? 

Does your sister vote, or wife, or any women you know?

Thank Ms Anthony for them.

Women in every state stood up when it was easier to stay down.  None stood taller in Oregon than Abigail Scott Duniway.

When someone achieves important status, they usually do it with help.

You’ve heard of Ida B. Wells-Barnett? Read the rest of this entry

Portland Becomes THE Portland

Janet Guthrie and Rolla Vollstedt talk it over

On opening day, June 1, 1905, the Lewis and Clark Expo shifted Portland, Oregon into gear.

The race to modern times began with the old surveyors on their first visit; they were still on the job a hundred years later.

To some, Lewis and Clark belong on top of the American secret agent list for their crafty mission to claim the west coast.

To others they are the greatest field scientists of their time.

On June 1, 1905 Lewis and Clark meant only one thing: PARTY.

Anything kicking off with a parade is a good time, this year and yesteryear, with the roar of the crowd and thunder of the wagons rolling by.

In perfect Lewis and Clark step, the Oregon Historical Society opened their own parade on June 1, 2011, complete with the roar and the thunder of race cars and race car people steering between Rolla Vollstedt’s Indy 500 cars and the Benson.   

Not what you expect from history? Read the rest of this entry